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Sunday, May 17, 2020 | History

1 edition of Eggs in water-glass found in the catalog.

Eggs in water-glass

United States. Department of Agriculture. Press Service

Eggs in water-glass

by United States. Department of Agriculture. Press Service

  • 379 Want to read
  • 11 Currently reading

Published by U.S.D.A. Press Service, Office of Information, and Extension Service in [Washington, D.C.] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Cooking (Eggs),
  • Eggs,
  • Storage

  • Edition Notes

    SeriesHomemaker news -- no. 220, Homemaker news -- no. 220.
    ContributionsUnited States. Department of Agriculture. Office of Information, United States. Extension Service
    The Physical Object
    Pagination1 l. ;
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL25608077M
    OCLC/WorldCa877150890

    Sodium silicate is a generic name for chemical compounds with the formula Na 2x Si y O 2y+x or (Na 2 O) x (SiO 2) y, such as sodium metasilicate Na 2 SiO 3, sodium orthosilicate Na 4 SiO 4, and sodium pyrosilicate Na 6 Si 2 O anions are often compounds are generally colorless transparent solids or white powders, and soluble in water in various amounts.   Place eggs in solution leaving about two inches of liquid above the eggs. One quart of water glass will treat about 16 dozen eggs.” Old-timers say that waterglassing can preserve eggs almost indefinitely, and countless online sources say that this is one of the most foolproof ways to preserve eggs.

    Plop the eggs in a bowl of water. The dates on the cartons are helpful, but just because they’ve come and gone doesn’t mean you need to throw the eggs you’re not sure whether or not.   Water Glass Your Eggs. Also known as liquid sodium silicate, this technique (known as “water glassing”) has been used since the should only use fresh, clean eggs without any dirt, mud, or debris. Refer to the National Center for Home Food Preservation website for more information.. Here’s an excerpt taken from The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book by Fannie Farmer, written in

      For this method to work, you will need glass jars (1 gallon each), 1-quart jar of water glass and cooled boiled water. How to do it: Collect only the eggs that are less than 24 hours old and do not wash them. Place the eggs in glass jars. Mix one part water glass with nine parts of cooled, boiled water.   Case in point: the water glass. Yet finding one with the right weight, shape and height can be a challenge, says Peter Miller, a cookbook author and .


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Eggs in water-glass by United States. Department of Agriculture. Press Service Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Egg in the Water Glass: A Journey of a Lifetime Paperback – January 1, by Olivia Andrade-Lage (Author)Author: Olivia Andrade-Lage. Eggs in water-glass book Egg in the Water Glass is a unique story of one family set against the backdrop of the southern San Joaquin Valley of California.

It traverses major epochs of American history: The Great Depression, World War II, and the Cold War. Boil ten to twelve quarts of water, rain water if possible.

When cold, add one quart of water glass. Place clean, strictly fresh eggs in crocks, small ends down, and cover them with the water glass mixture.

As the eggs will keep fresh for months, they may be preserved when the price is lowest. Eggs held in water glass at temperatures slightly above freezing for a period up to six months compare favorably with fresh eggs.

Eggs held in water glass at higher temperatures deteriorate in Eggs in water-glass book. The higher the temperature the more rapid is the by: 3. Mix 11 parts water to 1 part waterglass. Place your eggs, small end down if possible, into an earthenware crock.

Pour the waterglass solution over the eggs. Make sure the eggs are covered with at least 2 inches of the solution covering them all. Eggs preserved in water glass can be used for soft boiling or poaching, up to November.

Before boiling such eggs prick a tiny hole in the large end of the shell with a needle to keep them from cracking. They are satisfactory for frying until about December. What waterglass is Water glass is a sodium silicate solution that supposedly sealed the pores in the egg shells to stop them going bad.

What waterglass is not Water glass is not to be confused with isinglass which is made from fish swim bladders, and, in the old days, was used clarify cloudy wine.

You might be asking yourself why some eggs float in water and others sink. Here’s the science behind the egg freshness test in water. It’s all down to air pockets being present in the egg. When a bird lays an egg at its freshest point the egg will have in. To each 15 to 20 quarts of water 1 quart of water-glass should be added.

The solution should be prepared, placed in the jar or other suitable vessel, and the fresh eggs added from time to time until the jar is filled; but be sure that there is 2 inches of the solution covering the eggs. A 10 per cent solution of water glass is said to preserve eggs so effectually that at the end of three and one-half months eggs still appeared to be perfectly fresh.

In most packed eggs the yolk settles to one side, and the egg is then inferior in quality. A Drop Of Water: A Book of Science and Wonder Hardcover – April 1, Wick's other artfully composed photographs include a "wild wave" caused by a brown egg dropped in a water glass, soap bubbles with a "shimmering liquid skin," a snowflake at 60 Cited by: 1.

Dear Renee, I ordered some water glass through a Value Pharmacy in our closest town. It is called Sodium silicate and the brand name is Brite-Lite. I paid $ for a 30 fluid oz. bottle. I believe the ratio is 9 parts water to 1 part solution.

I think I got the recipe from Carla Emery's book on Homesteading. Grab a glass that's small enough for you to hold between your thumb and the rest of your digits.

Place the hard-boiled egg in the glass, fill it with about a half inch of water, cover the top of. Eggs can be stored for up to two to three months at temperatures no higher than 55°F without doing anything to them. However, the humidity needs to be close to 75%. This is an important factor in successful egg storage.

If humidity levels are too low, the eggs will dry out. If they are too high, the eggs will get moldy. You want clean. The factors studied in the preservation of eggs in waterglass were the use of untreated water as compared with distilled water in making up the solution, the use of different types of container and the effect of storage temperature.

Eggs kept as well for 6 months in untreated water as in distilled water, and the type of container was by: 3. The Rising Egg demonstrates the same principles in a slightly different way.

Over time the egg rises in the glass. This is because the salt gradually dissolves into the tap water in the layer above, slowly increasing the salinity and therefore the density of the water.

May 3, - Until this past winter, I had never hear the term “water glassing”. You’d think it has something to do with water, right. While water is involved, it actually has to do with eggs. Preserving eggs. That really caught my attention because we usually have so many eggs during the spring and summer months, and then.

Five Ways to Store Eggs without Refrigeration. Every cruising cookbook will mention some way of preserving eggs on long voyages.

I’ve personally heard of five basic ones; the choice depends on your pattern of thinking. Grease each egg carefully and thoroughly with Vaseline. Paint each egg with sodium silicate (water glass). Boil each egg To prepare the egg shells for the book test, use the tweezers to carefully chip a small circle from the small end of the egg until the egg will “sit-up” on its end.

Dump out the yolk and white and rinse the inside of the egg. Try to make six shells of similar heights—it is usually good to have a few extras.

But if you raise your own chickens, you may want to try to preserve some of your eggs. RELATED POST: Preserve Eggs With Slaked Lime or Water Glass INFORMATION BELOW FROM s COOKBOOKS: If eggs are to be preserved, they should not be washed unless their condition compels it, as washing removes the natural covering of the pores.

The Reliance Ink Company of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada was one of a number of firms that made Water Glass commercially available.

Normally sold in small cans, it was designed specifically for the storage of eggs. Instructions, as imprinted on the one pound tin, were simple. Thoroughly dissolve 1 pound of Reliance Water Glass in 1 gallon of water.Warm 1/8 cup oil in the microwave for about 10 seconds.

This much will be able to do about 2 dozen eggs. Dry eggs and carton. Put your gloves on!The commonest methods were by immersion in lime water – a more popular method for large scale preserving but having the disadvantage of giving a ‘limey’ flavour, or alternatively by immersion in ‘water glass’ (sodium silicate) – a common household method that kept the yolk ‘central’ in the egg.